Who is This Ennui Guy Anyway?

Reinhard Kuhn (the author of The Demon of Noontide: Ennui in Western Literature) defined ennui as “the state of emptiness that the soul feels when it is deprived of interest in action, life, and the…

Do You Want to Be a Writer?

Revisiting a 1938 classic about the art of writing. It’s a bit artsy, but edifying and even spiritual. …

Dostoyevsky’s Mock Execution

The whole thing was orchestrated, but the radicals fell for it. One, says Gary Morson, “had his hair turn white; a second went mad and never recovered his sanity; a third, whose two-hundredth birthd…

LA and southern California in general used to be a hot-bed of libertarian activity, so much so that New Yorker Murray Rothbard moved to California in the late 1970s. …

Give Peace a Chance

The differences are too great to bridge. War is abhorrent. We need to set up avenues for peaceful and orderly secession.…

How to Live Like a Zen Master

Zen, Christ, St. Therese Lisieux, C.S. Lewis: they all taught a similar thing. Cultivate the eyes of a child. …

In the Margin

A website that might drown you with good stuff. …

Seven Days Make One Weak

Breaking down the two parts of President Trump. Why riots are illogical. Miscellany: Seinfeld book, Peter Gunn. …

I gotta believe Tyrrell is still brilliantly funny, and Stein’s reflections on his days in Hollywood are always fascinating. He gave Jimmy Kimmel his first big break on Win Ben Stein’s Money (to b…

The Reality of Fr. Damien

God is good, so to the extent something is good, it has more existence . . . it’s more “real.”…

Seven Days Make One Weak

Why does Jack Dorsey engage in spiritual exercises? To gain superhuman powers? To end suffering? To attain enlightenment? To humble his undeserving heart? No, he does it in order to maintain “clarit…

Dr. Kizzy: Hero

The first draft of history, however, has been trying hard to build her up as the COVID Heroine. …

Chesterton: Journalist?

He landed that weekly column gig in 1905 and would do it for over thirty years, publishing over 1,600 columns. They paid him 350 pounds annually (which would equal about $45,000 today)…