Category: Reviews

The Weekly Eudemon

A round-up of good reading from the week

Squeezing Amazon, the existential benefits of gardening, and Bitcoin as it cracks $60,000. (“M” denotes Medium.com, so you may need a subscription to read.)

The Left hates Amazon because of how it treats its workers and because it’s an abject lesson in the  power of capitalism. The Right hates Amazon because of what Amazon did to Parler and its left-leaning agenda. I’m seeing more and more people fighting against that python. This woman describes how she weened herself off Amazon. And Marco Rubio just wrote an op-ed in USA Today that said conservatives won’t help Amazon in its fight against unionization, noting that the days when big business could count on conservative support are over.

I’m not a huge Marco Rubio fan, but that op-ed tells me he’s on the right track. Or at least has his ear to the political ground and is positioning himself for a 2024 run.… Read the rest

The Weekly Eudemon

A round-up of good reading from the week

Saving your marriage from the Oxford comma, Bitcatholic, and rolling back restrictions. (Excerpts to follow in the Traditional TDE Blog over the next couple of days. “M” denotes “Medium.com” and, therefore, you may need a subscription to read.)

Bitcoin is anti-institutional. It’s anti-authoritarian. It’s linked to buying sex and drugs. It’s . . . Catholic? That’s not exactly what Eric Sammons argues here, but he endorses the Bitcoin approach for the Catholic Church in the 21st century. Bitcoin is all about decentralization, especially online. In this era when Google, Twitter, and other behemoths throttle traditional religion, we need to embrace a decentralized approach. (Which is one reason I encourage everyone to set up a “junk” email folder and use it to subscribe to the heterodox writers out there you enjoy. I hope to set up a TDE newsletter this year, btw.)

“I like depriving myself of things,” said Kramer on Seinfeld. “It’s very monastic.” I think it’s a natural human trait, though people find it kind of weird and resist it. Even in my small town, middle-aged men want to “look cool” and “with it.” That’s one thing millennials seem to have right: they resist conventions, including the ones that say we should be obsessed with acquisition. Their bohemian resistance is often frustrating, but at times, it borders on the graceful, like when one millennial declares that “Owning a Decrepit Shack in The Middle of Nowhere Is The New American Millennial Dream.” (M) But warning: the article isn’t very good. It’s a Socialist rant against “unregulated” landlords and that’s about it. This is one of those articles in which the entire value is in the headline.… Read the rest

The Weekly Eudemon

A round-up of good reading from the week

Looking to live slow? You like Stoic wisdom? Think the vaccine is working? Those are a few of the topics touched on this week. (Excerpts to follow in the Traditional TDE Blog over the next couple of days. “M” denotes “Medium.com” and, therefore, you may need a subscription to read.)

I have signed up for this: The Live Slow Challenge. For a few years, I’ve been preaching the importance of slow living, with no autobiographical empirical evidence whatsoever. I, in other words, have been a hypocrite, albeit unintentionally. We’ll see if this challenge gets me into the non-groove.

The may who has made Stoicism into a cottage industry, Ryan Holiday, offers 100 Very Short Rules for a Better Life. I don’t think Ryan is even 35 years old yet, so I question his level of wisdom, but I feel like I know less and less every day, so maybe wisdom declines with the years. Okay, I don’t really believe that, but regardless, Christ was only 33 when he died, and he had some pretty good things to say (I know: he had an advantage). Ryan also relies heavily on a thorough reading regimen. Acquaintance with great minds is a great substitute for gained wisdom. (M)

Ryan Holiday also suggests three books to help you understand what’s going on right now. Disclosure: I haven’t read any of them and have only even heard of one of them: The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History by John M. Barry; Leadership: In Turbulent Times by Doris Kearns Goodwin; Parting the Waters: America in the King Years 1954–63 by Taylor Branch. (M)

(I gotta be honest, I envy Ryan Holiday. The guy has fashioned a comfortable living for himself … Read the rest