Tag: Matt Taibbi

Tattletale Journalism to Apple’s Rumored Purchase of Bitcoin

A Tuesday Round-up of Worthy Articles

The Rise of Tattletale Journalism. There is a whole new genre of journalism out there: “Journalists” telling on people who don’t think correctly.

Glenn Greenwald ain’t havin’ it . . . and neither should we.

A new and rapidly growing journalistic “beat” has arisen over the last several years that can best be described as an unholy mix of junior high hall-monitor tattling and Stasi-like citizen surveillance. It is half adolescent and half malevolent. Its primary objectives are control, censorship, and the destruction of reputations for fun and power. Though its epicenter is the largest corporate media outlets, it is the very antithesis of journalism.

I’ve written before about one particularly toxic strain of this authoritarian “reporting.” Teams of journalists at three of the most influential corporate media outlets — CNN’s “media reporters” (Brian Stelter and Oliver Darcy), NBC’s “disinformation space unit” (Ben Collins and Brandy Zadrozny), and the tech reporters of The New York Times (Mike Isaac, Kevin Roose, Sheera Frenkel) — devote the bulk of their “journalism” to searching for online spaces where they believe speech and conduct rules are being violated, flagging them, and then pleading that punitive action be taken (banning, censorship, content regulation, after-school detention). These hall-monitor reporters are a major factor explaining why tech monopolies, which (for reasons of self-interest and ideology) never wanted the responsibility to censor, now do so with abandon and seemingly arbitrary blunt force: they are shamed by the world’s loudest media companies when they do not.


Matt Taibbi follows suit, pointing out that we’ve reached a point where personal privacy is dangerous, official secrecy is not.

These people believe bad-think, left unaddressed, results in Donald Trump being elected. Therefore, as Chen and Roose put it in a chat last week, it’s “
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Seven Days Make One Weak

Taibbi on the MSM problem, puzzles, the Rolling Stones, and seed catalogues

Matt Taibbi nails another media analysis.

He points out that increasing numbers of Americans don’t trust the media and think it’s understandable.

There are at least three reasons.

One, the media is ridiculously partisan.

John Heileman at MSNBC compared Biden’s speech to Abe Lincoln’s second inaugural, and suggested that the sight of “the Clintons, the Bushes, and the Obamas” gathered for the event was like “the Marvel superheroes all back in one place” (this was not the first post-election Avengers comparison to be heard on cable). Rachel Maddow talked about going through “half a box of Kleenex” as she watched the proceedings. Chris Wallace on Fox said Biden’s lumbering speech was “the best inaugural address I ever heard,” John Kennedy’s “Ask Not” speech included. The joyful tone was set the night before by CNN’s David Challen, who said lights along the Washington Mall were like “extensions of Joe Biden’s arms embracing America.”

Two, the media has been partisan for a long time, but over the past ten years, Taibbi points out, the mainstream press has become Pravda for the Democratic Party (my analogy, not Taibbi’s). But unlike the editors at Pravda, the MSM editors admit and defend it, saying it’s their job to stomp out dissident views.

If anything, Sullivan said, the press should stand even taller in its opposition to red-state lie merchants like Josh Hawley and Ted Cruz, “without fearing that they’d be called partisan.”

Karen Attiah, the Post’s global opinions editor, took the same approach. She wrote that Trump had been caused in part by the media’s penchant for “balance” and “presenting both sides.” Going forward, it will therefore be necessary to work even harder avoid missteps like 

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Seven Days Make One Weak

The Left goes left, Taibbi, investments

I’ve noticed something lately: The liberals I opposed in my youth are the thinkers I enjoy the most these days.

I was born conservative. Not Alex Keaton conservative, but definitely on the Right and far more politically interested than my peers.

As a student at the University of Michigan and Notre Dame, I always found myself to the right of my acquaintances, often uncomfortably so.

But now, 30 years later? Those old liberals and I have moved closer together.

I no doubt drifted a bit to the Left. Although my history studies and innate conservatism initiated my interest in converting to Catholicism, once I joined the Church, I adopted a worldview and faith that tempered my more conservative instincts.

But I was still a JPII convert, which means I have remained conservative.

So I’ve concluded those liberals from my youth have drifted to the Right, which would be normal. People get more conservative as they get older, especially once they have kids and realize that it’s a beautiful world that doesn’t need to be torn down by a centralized state to create a world you’d prefer. When you hold that baby, you think, “This is alright. Right here, right now.” And at that moment, your mental landscape shifts to the Right.

Liberalism is discontent with present moment. Conservatism is contentment with the present moment. That’s why liberalism wants to change things and conservatives want to keep them the same. It doesn’t make one correct and one wrong. It’s just the way things are.

It also means that those self-identified “Lefties” in their 50s are beginning to think more like me. They’re still Leftists, but they have sensibilities more like mine. I’m talking about folks like Bill Burr, Joe Rogan, and Matt Taibbi.

These guys … Read the rest