Month: February 2013

Resignation Question and Answer

From my priest friend in Rome:

A little question and answer about the Pope’s resignation.

Yes, I am sad; I love Benedict XVI dearly.

Has this ever happened before?
Yes, in 1415, Pope Gregory XII resigned from Office to end the Western Schism.

Can the Pope still do this?
Yes, canon 332 of the Code of Canon Law foresees a papal resignation:
“If it happens that the Roman Pontiff resigns his office, it is required for validity that the resignation is made freely and properly manifested but not that it is accepted by anyone.”

Did the Pope do this publicly and freely?
Yes, he did it publicly this morning at an ordinary gathering of Cardinals. He did it freely, according to his words: “For this reason, and well aware of the seriousness of this act, with full freedom I declare that I renounce the ministry of Bishop of Rome, Successor of Saint Peter, entrusted to me by the Cardinals on 19 April 2005, in such a way, that as from 28 February 2013, at 20:00 hours, the See of Rome, the See of Saint Peter, will be vacant and a Conclave to elect the new Supreme Pontiff will have to be convoked by those whose competence it is.”

What happens next?
There will be a conclave a few weeks after Pope Benedict’s resignation on February 28th to elect a new Bishop of Rome who will be the 265th successor of Saint Peter and the 266th Bishop of Rome.

Is the world going to end!? 🙂
No, the world will not end, unless Jesus comes again which could happen in five minutes, five days, five years, five hundred years or five million years…

Are you worried about the future of the Church?
No, the Church is Jesus’ Body and He is … Read the rest

The Resignation

From a Good and Reliable Priest (currently stationed in Rome):

“With regards to the present moment I would also want to encourage. The Holy Father said on Saturday evening the following words: “There is a false pessimism that says: the time of Christianity is over. No: it begins anew! We can be sure that the future is truly God’s: this is the great certainty of our life, the great and true optimism that we know.” (Feb 8, 2013 to Roman Seminarians)

“Also, the last Pope to have resigned was Gregory XII in 1415. This ended the Great Western Schism at that time.

“Canon 332 paragraph 2 says: “If it happens that the Roman Pontiff resigns his office, it is required for validity that the resignation is made freely and properly manifested but not that it is accepted by anyone.”

“The Holy Father at an ordinary meeting of Cardinals this morning announced his decision and made clear: “For this reason, and well aware of the seriousness of this act, with full freedom I declare that I renounce the ministry of Bishop of Rome, Successor of Saint Peter, entrusted to me by the Cardinals on 19 April 2005, in such a way, that as from 28 February 2013, at 20:00 hours, the See of Rome, the See of Saint Peter, will be vacant and a Conclave to elect the new Supreme Pontiff will have to be convoked by those whose competence it is.”

“Therefore, the Holy Father has chosen this with full freedom and declared it publicly in accordance with the law of the Church for validity.

“Lastly, after his resignation on Feb 28, there is a provision that a new conclave happen in no less than 15 day and no more than 20 days.”… Read the rest

Monday

Oklahoma!

Our local high school performed Oklahoma! this last weekend. I didn’t have any kids in the musical, but one good friend of the family’s had the lead (“Curley”), plus we knew quite a few of the other kids, so we decided to go. The kids did an excellent job and it was an enjoyable evening, but I was struck by how weak the storyline was.

I guess Oklahoma! played a big role in the evolution of the musical. Not only was it Rodgers and Hammerstein’s first collaboration, but it marked a transition on Broadway: Musicals had (apparently) been comical only, but through performances like Oklahoma!, they were developing into a full-blown performing arts medium. From Wikipedia: “This musical, building on the innovations of the earlier Show Boat, epitomized the development of the ‘book musical,’ a musical play where the songs and dances are fully integrated into a well-made story with serious dramatic goals that are able to evoke genuine emotions other than laughter.”

I was also struck by the ribaldry. This was, what, early 1940s? It was the heyday of proper decorum in the mainline performing arts, but the musical features a loose young woman (Ado Annie Carnes). At first, I thought the woman just liked to kiss boys, but it became evidence that she was doing a lot more than just kissing. Between references to losing her “bloomers” when she’s with the boys to her fiance saying that their first child better look like him to her father nearly forcing another man to marry Annie when he finds out what they’ve been up to, it’s pretty evident that she was, well, a slut. Perhaps even more noteworthy, her behavior doesn’t really seem to bother her young suitor (as long as she’s faithful once they’re married).

That … Read the rest

Something for Sunday Morning

“At the root of insincerity lies pride. This vice prevents a person from submitting to God, recognizing his dependence on God and doing what God wants. A proud person has difficulty in even recognizing that he is doing wrong and needs to correct his behavior. When this vice takes root in the soul it makes objectivity all but impossible. Not wanting to acknowledge his faults and failings, such a person seeks excuses for bad behavior. The end of this road is spiritual blindness.” Francis Fernandez… Read the rest

Saturday

Violent Cities

This story caught my eye: San Pedro de Sula (Honduras) is the world’s most violent city. I’ve long taken an interest in knowing what city is the most violent in America (probably because my root town, Detroit, always contends for that top spot), but I’d never given any attention to what cities in the world are the most violent. Here’s the rest of the top ten list:

2. Acapulco, Mexico
3. Caracas, Venezuela
4. Tegucigalpa, Honduras
5. Torreón, Mexico
6. Maceió, Brazil
7. Cali, Colombia
8. Nuevo Laredo, Mexico
9. Barquisimeto, Venezuela
10. João Pessoa, Brazil

Forty of the top fifty cities are in Latin America.

Boy, nothing like giving the anti-immigration crowd some powerful anecdotal ammunition (not to mention the anti-Catholic crowd).

My daughter is supposed to go to World Youth Day this summer in Rio de Janeiro. I’m a bit worried, yes. But then again, Rio was recently ranked the world’s happiest city. Link. (Quote from another site, which I won’t link to, since it triggered a malware warning on my computer: “In first place, not surprisingly, is the beautiful city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil known for stunning beaches and sweeping city views. The city ranked high with its culture and shopping centers and outdoor attractions.”)

The study on city violence, incidentally, ranked New Orleans the most violent among all U.S. cities (ranked 17th).

Decent Late Night

“Several states are now looking into the possibility of taxing marijuana as a source of revenue. That is so typical of the government, isn’t it? Trying to squeeze blood from a stoner.” Leno

“This is crazy. The justice department is saying that President Obama can order drone strikes on American citizens, that he can do that. In a related story, this is the last Obama joke … Read the rest

Friday

BYCU

The beer world has grown complicated. Eric Asimov counts the ways. Excerpt: “Nowadays, the beer shelves are so crammed with brews labeled Maximus, Monstrous and Imperial that you feel as if you’ve stumbled into a file of e-mail spam. In this world, bigger is always better, and why not? After all, 16 percent alcohol pinot noirs rule the wine ratings. Why not a beer like Stone Ruination I.P.A., so-called, the brewery proudly asserts, because of the ruinous effect of ‘this massive hop monster’ on your palate.”

For the Techno Drunk

iDrunk: Nifty little device protects your Mom’s coffee table, keeps your beer cold, and charges your iPhone.

Columnist Tackles Major Problem

A columnist at the Huffington Post tackles one of the big problems in the world today: Wine labels, many of which supposedly insult women: “First we had ‘critter’ labels for wine — you know, Yellow Tail, Little Penguin, Dancing Bull, Smoking Loon. Then came what I call ‘dessert’ labels — Cupcake, Layer Cake. Let’s not forget the ‘mommy’ labels — MommyJuice, Mommy’s Little Helper. Now we have what I’m calling ‘identity’ labels — Middle Sister, Bridesmaid and Skinnygirl. Do we really need a wine label to tell us who we are or how we should be? I cringe when I see these labels. . . . My hope is that if enough people stop buying these silly labels, the wine companies will have to start treating women as serious wine consumers, or in other words, as equals.”

I repeat my earlier plea: Help me bring the phrase “petty souled” back into the public discourse. I think it’s the only adjective that really fits these kind of people.

It kind of reminds me of the First World Problems Twitter account, where people in developed countries … Read the rest

Thursday

streetsign.jpgEclectic Thursday

I don’t pay much attention to college football recruiting, but this caught my eye: Ole Miss may have snagged the top-rated recruiting class in the nation yesterday. I like Mississippi. I’d love to see Mississippi become a powerhouse. But Mississippi? I suspect it’s time to start the NCAA investigation. * * * * * * * I read about a great gig for college students yesterday: Filling out surveys. It doesn’t pay much (about $2 apiece), but hey, it’s gotta be pretty low-impact work, the kind you can do while killing twenty minutes. Check out GetPaidSurveys.com (but watch for survey scams: SurveyPolice.com). Legitimate surveys will never ask for your bank account or social security numbers. * * * * * * * Funny Fallon: “Pakistan is opening an amusement park and a zoo in the same town where the raid on Osama Bin Laden took place. The zoo is pretty cool, but I’ve heard you won’t be able to see the seals until it’s too late.” * * * * * * * They found Richard III’s remains under a parking lot. At least one Catholic journalist is lobbying for his proper Catholic burial. … Read the rest

Wednesday

Bullets

I don’t get involved much in the gun control debate, but this quip yesterday made me smile: “If guns kill people, how does anybody get out of a gun show alive?” * * * * * * * Who could’ve possibly seen anything like this coming: “Prison guard pregnant with cop killer’s child, prosecutors say.” * * * * * * * “Oregon bakery refuses to make same-sex wedding cake.” “Big deal,” I thought. But it is a big deal: The Oregon AG is investigating. It appears the freedom of association and religious conviction loses against the right of a gay couple to have a particular baker make their wedding cake. It makes sense, of course. Just weigh ’em: Freedom of religion and association v. Cake. The latter obviously wins. * * * * * * * Speaking of reasons to retreat from the world: I’m going to start micro-tomatoes and baby peppers soon, using the Wall of Water to start the season a month early. I’m going to put the plants in smaller self-watering containers and put the containers in the Walls of Water. I just came up with that idea yesterday. Pretty stoked.

Read the rest