The Daily Eudemon
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    Wednesday

    Happy 9/11 Day. Reminder to my right-leaning readers: “God Bless the U.S.A.” is not the national anthem.

    Rare Harvest Moon

    This Friday

    Before fall’s official arrival on September 23, a rare sighting of the Harvest Moon will happen on Friday, September 13th. That’s when a full moon occurs closest to the autumnal equinox. According to Farmers’ Almanac contributing astronomer, Joe Rao, this combination is a once-in-a-20-year occurrence, so your next chance to see one in the U.S. is August 13, 2049.

    Fear the (Inverted) Curve?

    Typically, long-term treasuries offer higher yields. Harvey though focused in particular on the rare times when the yield on the 10-year falls below that of the 2-year or the 3-month—creating an inverted yield curve. The research bore fruit. In those moments when the atypical occurred for a period of a quarter or longer, a recession followed.

    Distilling it down, he theorizes that when investors around the world sense incoming financial danger, they turn to the world’s safest asset—the U.S. 10-year treasury, a move that drives the yield of that product down relative to that its short-term brethren.

    Hillsdale College: Killing It

    Daughter Meg is a freshman.

    Once again, the incoming freshmen are the highest-performing class in Hillsdale College history. . . .

    The freshmen — 186 men and 178 women — have an average high school GPA of 3.91, up from last year’s 3.89. Their average ACT score, 31, was significantly higher than the previous record of 30.26 in 2017.

    As Hillsdale College President Larry Arnn said in his Freshman Convocation speech, the incoming class is full of “ambitious, active students.”

    But Arnn also reminded the freshmen that the Hillsdale experience is much different from — and harder than — other schooling.

    “It’s not practical to come here,” Arnn said. “You have to take yourself out of the world for four years. You have to make it with your whole heart, or else go somewhere easier.”

    The 364 members of the Class of 2023 fit in the college’s goal range of 360 – 380 students per class. The admission rate tied last year’s all-time low of 37%, a number which Senior Director of Admissions Zack Miller said can be attributed to the growing interest in Hillsdale from around the country.

    “We haven’t changed the type of student that we are recruiting,” Miller said. “What has changed is Hillsdale’s popularity across the country and the number of interested students in a classical liberal arts education. Because there are no other schools like Hillsdale out there, we’re seeing more students want to attend.”

    Although the percentage of students from Michigan was not as low as last year’s record 25%, it remained lower than percentages from the previous 7 years at just 29%. The remaining 71% of the class comes from 37 other states and 8 other countries.

    More on Hillsdale College

    The Surprising History of American College Dorms

    Residence halls were a feature of most early colleges, but a fair number of universities dispensed with them. State universities located in towns of any size frequently looked upon dormitories as an extravagance and students entirely capable of renting lodging elsewhere. The first dormitory at Rutgers was only built in 1890. The University of Wisconsin at Madison had some housing but then eliminated it for decades.

    Boardinghouses almost always existed on the outskirts of universities, but were generally viewed as fertile ground for immorality or even literal disease, and campus residences a better means of shaping the moral and educational lives of their students—which is all true to some extent. The sheer number of moral concerns affecting the lives of students receded as time went on, although stances on these questions have never gone away, and have risen again in prominence in the age of institutional social-justice claptrap.

    The notion of cultivating a seamless educational environment no doubt has considerable value. A University of Wisconsin pamphlet advertised new dormitories as “designed to bring into the life of every undergraduate the cultural inspiration and force of the university.”

    Simone Weil

    If it’s about Simone Weil, I’m reading it. The Jewish mystic who loved the Catholic Church but couldn’t bring herself to enter it..

    One needn’t have to write well about Weil, the supremely idiosyncratic mid-century French philosopher, mystic, and social theorist, for the gravity of her significance to pull both reader and writer beyond the event horizon of her thought. When a writer successfully conveys the heft of her ideas about attention and grace, it’s obvious. When a writer is able to effectively argue against the grain of her thought—her gnosticism, say—that’s useful also. And when a writer sort of falls on their face, totally failing to think either with or against Weil, that’s illuminating in its own way too. Sometimes examples of other people missing the mark are useful lessons in what not to do.

    Bookmark it: del.icio.us | Reddit | Slashdot | Digg | Facebook | Technorati | Google | StumbleUpon | Window Live | Tailrank | Furl | Netscape | Yahoo | BlinkList

    One Response to “Wednesday”

    1. Kevin Says:

      What sets Hillsdale’s classical liberal arts education apart from from St. John’s, Thomas More, Thomas Aquinas, Northeast Catholic, et al? I’m genuinely curious, not being provocative.

     

     

    Enter Amazon here, buy something, and get me a kickback.


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    Abbey-Roads
    Acts of the Apostasy
    After Abortion
    Aggie Catholics
    All Manner of Things
    Belinda’s Brain
    Bethune Catholic
    Betty Duffy
    Book Reviews and More
    Catholic Blogs
    Catholic Exchange
    Catholic Fire
    Charlotte Was Both
    Chesterton and Friends
    Crossroads
    Decent Films
    Digital Hairshirt
    Dyspeptic Mutterings
    EWTN
    Fathers of the Church
    First Principles
    Get Blogs
    Gilbert Magazine
    Godspy
    Happy Catholic
    Mark Shea
    Mere Comments
    Michelle Reitemeyer
    More Last Than Star
    National Catholic Register
    New Advent
    Phat Catholic
    Pillar and Fire
    Post Modern Papist
    PowerBlog
    Pro Ecclesia
    Quaffs and Quibbles
    Reasoned Audacity
    Reconnaissance of the Western Tradition
    Roman Catholic Info
    Ruri et Orbi
    Scholium
    Shadow of Diogenes
    Signs of the Times: Salvo Blog
    Some Have Hats
    St. Blog’s Parish Blog Digger
    St. Blog’s Parish Directory
    St. James Journal
    St. Peter Canisius Apostolate
    Standing on My Head
    Stella Maris
    Stony Creek Digest
    Streams of Mercy
    Stupid Scholar
    Suicide of the West
    Summa Minutiae
    Taki
    The American Conservative
    The Blue Boar
    The Cafeteria is Closed
    The Crescat
    The Curt Jester
    The Dawn Patrol
    The Drunken Dollar
    The Impractical Christian
    The Inn at the End of the World
    The Michiana Blawg
    The Muniment Room
    The Radical Academy
    The Reticulator
    The Saint Wannabe
    The Scratching Post
    The Snoring Scholar
    The Summa Mamas
    The Waffling Anglican
    The Western Confucian
    Things and Stuff
    Thursday Night Gumbo
    Uncovering Orthodoxy
    Victor Lams
    Video Meliora
    Vita Mea
    Vox Nova
    What's Wrong with the World
    With Both Hands
    Within the Garden
    Without Having Seen
    World Wide Words

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