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    Tuesday
    October 23, 2018

    misc-rambling-picMiscellaneous Rambling

    Man, 7,000 immigrants marching toward America, although it seems pretty clear they know they won’t be admitted. It’s sad, and I gotta admit: I feel some guilt. If my history is accurate, Honduras was Ground Zero of the U.S. Banana Republics: countries governed primarily to benefit U.S. corporations, without the benefit of the rule of law or without giving priority to local interests (which every government, by virtue of its very existence, is obligated to do). It looks like Honduras never recovered, and these people are paying the price. We have to protect our borders, but geesh. Should we at least acknowledge some blood on our hands? I’m really torn and am open to correction.

    misc-rambling-picThis is a kind of interesting piece: Creating the champagne of marijuana in California. It’s about the marijuana business and how small growers are preparing to compete with Big Cannabis. It’s basically a story that parallels the beer industry: big beer v. craft brewers. Craft brewers focus on making high quality beer, while the big boys concentrate on marketing.

    misc-rambling-picThis looks like it could’ve come straight out of the Shire:

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    Monday
    October 22, 2018

    Miscellaneous Rambling

    The new podcast is up. You can access it at The Weekly Eudemon podcast page: Zen, the “Fall” of Rome, Small Talk, Drinking with Commies, More. If you have an iTunes account, please subscribe to it and leave a favorable review. Remember: Subscribe to The Weekly Eudemon (not “TWE,” which is the old feed that will be discontinued soon).

    I think my discussion about the fall of the Roman Empire could’ve been 90 seconds shorter, but otherwise, I’m happy with the way the episode came out.

    Ceiling. TrastevereAbout ten years ago, I sat down during vacation and cranked out a collection of mini-essays regarding books I had greatly enjoyed. I never did anything with the essays, but I had developed a solid, if small, core of work: 16 essays. I decided to post them all to the new Eudemon Podcast page. If you care to check them out, click here.

    Ceiling. TrastevereI found this article a little disturbing: Why The Mega Millions Jackpot Is Nothing But Another Tax On America’s Poor. Excerpts:

    American adults spent an average of $251 on lottery tickets last year. With a return of 53 cents on the dollar, this means the average person threw away $118 on unsuccessful lotto tickets.

    More than 5% of lottery winners declare bankruptcy within 5 years of taking home the jackpot. Despite their drawbacks, though, lotteries are no doubt here for the long haul – in states that have lotteries, an average of 11% of their total revenues come from lottery ticket sales, and the number is even as high as 36% in 2 states (West Virginia and Michigan).

    It’s difficult to pinpoint exactly who is investing so much money in a product that provides poor returns, but numerous studies show that lower-income people spend a much greater proportion of their earnings on lotteries than do wealthier people. One figure suggests that households making less than $13,000 a year spend a full 9 percent of their income on lotteries. This of course makes no sense – poor people should be the least willing to waste their hard-earned cash on games with such terrible odds of winning.

    Now, I’m a long-time opponent of any sort of Prohibitionism that grounds itself on the principle that the poor are too stupid to take care of themselves. (1) I don’t believe it, and (2) It’s demeaning to the poor. To use a current phrase, it “deprives the poor of their agency.”

    But: There are now plenty of places to gamble in the United States (30 states now have casinos), and most casinos offer far better odds than 53-freakin’-percent: The payback percentage in most casino machines is in the 90- to 97-percent range.

    So why do states advertise their lotteries so heavily? I think we all know the answer to that. The mere fact that we all know the answer and don’t find it disturbing, is itself a bit disturbing.

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    October 20, 2018

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    Friday
    October 19, 2018

    IMG_3150Brews You Can Use

    Well, LeBron led the Lakers with 26 points last night, but they lost in his debut. I’ve slowly warmed to LeBron over the years, even if he toes the BLM line on all things politics. This recent piece ratcheted him up a few levels in my book: LeBron James says his sons, ages 14 and 11, drink wine with their dad. It’s good to hear public figures strike a reasonable chord when it comes to alcohol. He didn’t say he and the kids get hammered together. It’s clearly a situation in which the boys have a glass of wine with dinner, and every sane person knows there’s nothing wrong with that. The neo-Prohibitionists, of course, ain’t havin’ nun of it.

    IMG_3150Speaking of children, Kentucky now has two barrels of bourbon for every child . . . and adult. But don’t worry, the kids aren’t drinking all that bourbon. It’s simply a profit deal: “The distilling industry is an $8.5 billion economic and tourism engine, according to the KDA, that generates 17,500 jobs with $800 million in payroll. The KDA’s Kentucky Bourbon Trail and Kentucky Bourbon Trail Craft Trail draw hundreds of thousands of visitors who made 1.2 million stops at participating distilleries last year, according to the KDA.”

    IMG_3150I might have to expound on this a lot more in the podcast: Communism continues to cause heavy drinking in Eastern European countries. I’m reminded that alcoholism is also rampant in Scotland . . . which has become one of the most welfare-laden regions of Europe. Substance abuse is also rampant in the inner cities. There’s a common theme here.

    IMG_3150I’ve never, ever been into morning drinking. This, despite the fact that I admire a few practitioners of the craft: “In an e-mail, biographer Joseph Pearce told me, ‘It’s certainly safe to assume that Tolkien, Lewis, et al drank ale during the morning gatherings at the Eagle and Child. This is clear from the memories of others who joined them at these gatherings and is also clear from at least one of Tolkien’s letters.'” Link. If you like to drink in the morning, and you are the snobbish sort, here’s an article for you: How to Pair Wine With Breakfast Sandwiches.

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    October 18, 2018

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    4Chan
    October 17, 2018

    As documented by Angela Nagle, the 4Chan universe is populated with reprobates with nary a shred of decency.

    And I love ’em.

    Their most recent campaign: Today’s left as NPC players. There’s too much background in the story for me to effectively recount it here. I simply recommend this Zero Hedge piece, as well as this summary from the New York Times.

    Priceless stuff. Spot on, at least as far as the bulk of the young leftists on campus go:

    “The NPC meme essentially meant to ridicule the post-election perpetual outrage culture in which liberals simply parrot the latest talking points from their favorite pundits, who do their thinking for them.” Zero Hedge.

    “Pro-Trump internet trolls have spent the past several years mocking anti-Trump people as whiny, easily triggered snowflakes who are primarily motivated by social acceptance rather than by logic and critical thinking.” New York Times.

    With respect to the Times quote, it’s accurate, but I wouldn’t necessarily describe them as “pro-Trump.” They’re anti-everything establishment, and they, indeed, have little tolerance for the drones that we call “students” at our colleges and universities.

    Does anyone seriously doubt that the students protesting, X, Y, and Z are little more than kids just joining in? We know now that a large number of protestors in the 1960s were just doing it because it was fun and it was a great way to meet chicks. Are we really to think these young people are now all incredibly knowledgeable and wise constituents, who are weighing their experience of the real world against their Marxist professors’ words? Of course not. They’re just kids. And because they are, by all reasonable presumption, merely parroting their professors’ and friends’ words, they are NPCs. That’s all this is saying, and it’s funny. Real funny.

    So funny, in fact, Twitter is banning all references to the NPCs themes on the very thin grounds that they’re misleading the electorate (because a few Twitter accounts sporting the NPC meme started saying the election is on November 7th, instead of the 6th).

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    Wednesday

    Small Talk

    Small talk. I dislike it. It can be argued that it is part of the lubrication that keeps social wheels moving smoothly, but I’m not talking about cordialities (“Hi,” “How are the kids doing?” etc.). I’m talking about extended conversations that are either (i) merely killing time, or (ii) taking up valuable time. The former (killing time), I find merely find awkward; I have no serious aversion to it. The latter (taking up valuable time), I find irritating, frustrating, stress-inducing, and a rude imposition.

    St. Theresa of Avila criticizes small talk in her autobiography. She criticizes it on spiritual grounds, but I can’t remember at this writing what they were. I assume it basically revolves around the fact that every act of speaking is an assertion of self, small talk takes up time that could be spent more profitably, and talking is always a potential occasion of sin (when you think about it, it’s hard to speak 100% truthfully during any extended discussion; reality simply contains too many elements to convey accurately once your talk goes beyond a very limited scope).

    I think I’ll hit this topic in an upcoming podcast. If you haven’t made your way over to The Weekly Eudemon, here’s the link.

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    Tuesday
    October 16, 2018

    misc-rambling-picMiscellaneous Rambling

    I find out later today whether Tess’ flowers survived the freeze. We have hundreds of flowers in the field. I brought in a handful last night so they wouldn’t go to waste, but I fear this morning’s freeze might destroy the many I couldn’t bring inside. I’ll inspect them when I get home from work tonight.

    misc-rambling-picWow: Judge Dismisses Stormy Daniels Lawsuit Against Trump, Orders Her to Pay His Legal Fees. It’s rare that a party is ordered to pay another party’s legal fees. Unless there’s a statute that requires it, a judge, in order to award fees, pretty much has to conclude that the lawsuit was fraudulent: filed in bad faith, no basis in fact, etc. The rules could be different in California in this regard, but I doubt it. The principle that “each side pays his own fees” is known as the “American rule” (the English rule says, “Losing party pays the other side’s fees).

    misc-rambling-picModern Studies Corroborate Christian Tradition, Episode 1,982,009: Just 7 Days of Small Acts of Kindness Will Make You Happier, Oxford Research Proves.

    misc-rambling-picFor the record, I, too, am 1/32nd American Indian . . . or maybe it’s 1/64th. Either way, I definitely have American Indian blood. My g-g-g-g-? grandfather on my mother’s side in the 19th century was an Indian. No joke. It helped not a jot when I applied to Harvard.

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    Monday
    October 15, 2018

    Miscellaneous Rambling

    The new podcast episode is up. My nephew owns a promotion business, so he got his voiceover guy to record a new introduction for me. You might recognize the voice. He’s done voice acting work for quite a few national chains. I plan on switching up the intro every week to keep it fresh.

    For tech neophytes: You can just click that link above and listen to the podcast directly from The Weekly Eudemon website. The site also has the last three episodes. I’m in the process of trying to figure out what to do with my first eight episodes, but they can still be found at Anchor under “TWE.”

    Ceiling. TrastevereThe newest episode also features the official launch of The Weekly Eudemon Show Notes page. For those who simply can’t stand my voice but are half-curious about what I’m saying, you can get a decent summary at that page:

    This episode looks again at my concept of “primary obligations,” pointing out that it’s a reference point, not a stick to beat others with. I also look briefly at Tolstoy’s “family narcissism” and that hard question: is it harder to deal with toddlers or teenagers, on a day-to-day basis.

    I then introduce Zen. Due to a lot of interest among listeners, this will become a recurring topic of the podcast. I look at the fundamental approach of Zen, which is to smash through the “subject-object” way of viewing things, to approach life with the eyes of a little child. I also touch briefly on the thought of Australian philosopher, Samuel Alexander, who influenced C.S. Lewis (reference Surprised by Joy).

    For a great introduction to Zen, I highly recommend the lead essay in Thomas Merton’s Mystics and Zen Masters. (Skip the first five pages or so.)

    I then introduce a second topic that I hope will be recurring: The Middle Ages. I look briefly at the “fall” of Rome, then break down every century from 800 to 1500 . . . in a 10,000-foot look in eight minutes.

    Finally, I talk about this week’s saints, with focus on St. Theresa Avila and St. Ignatius of Antioch, including Theresa’s influence on Edith Stein and Ignatius’ legendary role in Matthew Chapter 18.

    Ceiling. TrastevereThe modern Left has always been a politics of hate. From Lenin’s murderous hate to the Days of Rage to eco-terrorism to feminist rage. This piece just exemplifies it all. It half-annoyed/half-humored me to hear the gay marriage proponents describe their opponents as hateful people, when anyone who is remotely acquainted with leftist politics over the past 100 years knows it’s full of rage against society as currently constituted . . . and full of aims to bring it and all its perceived injustices tumbling down as a prelude to replacing it with a new world designed by leftist intelligentsia. They’re full of anger against anyone, like this scribe, who attempts to stand athwart what they perceive to be an historical imperative.

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    Saturday
    October 13, 2018

    It’s possible, maybe possible, that Republicans have woken up and said, “You know what? Let’s just start swinging back hard. Screw convention. Our opponents are completely unhinged at this point and can’t be dealt with conventionally.”

    The GOP hasn’t had swagger since 1980. Trump, for all his faults, has it. It’s time the GOP learn it, look absurdity in the eye, and sneer.

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    Friday
    October 12, 2018

    BYCU

    “The question is: When they have naked dancers, how is it sanitary to eat food?”

    That’s not a question I ask myself very often, but it’s the focus of this article out of Toledo.

    The conclusion: Food a strip clubs is safe because the clubs assiduously follow the rules.

    I have no grounds to dispute it, but the mere fact that the food preparation complies with the health department regulations doesn’t satisfy it for me. If you have naked bodies shaking inches from your food, common sense would dictate that it’s not a good arrangement. I seriously doubt it’s much of a risk, but still. A little disgusting. And when you think about this recent article, Hand dryers suck in fecal bacteria and blow it all over your hands, study finds, you just wonder about such things in general.

    Hey, there’s a sucker born every minute: Texas bar owners launch a line of beer for dogs.

    Within weeks of their launch, all three flavors of their beer — IPA Lot in the Yard, Mailman Malt Licker and Session.squirrel! — are available in 15 bars throughout the city, including Front Porch Pub and FM Kitchen and Bar, for a recommended price of about $5 a can. And they’re getting requests to ship cans across the country.

    “Everyone likes the idea of having a beer with their dog, you know?” says Steve, who is 41. Still, while the Longs saw the potential in their brew from the very beginning, they had no idea it would take off so quickly.

    Dog lovers often consider their dogs as their children, but if I have a beer with my children, I get arrested.

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    Thursday
    October 11, 2018

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