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    Monday
    October 15, 2018

    Miscellaneous Rambling

    The new podcast episode is up. My nephew owns a promotion business, so he got his voiceover guy to record a new introduction for me. You might recognize the voice. He’s done voice acting work for quite a few national chains. I plan on switching up the intro every week to keep it fresh.

    For tech neophytes: You can just click that link above and listen to the podcast directly from The Weekly Eudemon website. The site also has the last three episodes. I’m in the process of trying to figure out what to do with my first eight episodes, but they can still be found at Anchor under “TWE.”

    Ceiling. TrastevereThe newest episode also features the official launch of The Weekly Eudemon Show Notes page. For those who simply can’t stand my voice but are half-curious about what I’m saying, you can get a decent summary at that page:

    This episode looks again at my concept of “primary obligations,” pointing out that it’s a reference point, not a stick to beat others with. I also look briefly at Tolstoy’s “family narcissism” and that hard question: is it harder to deal with toddlers or teenagers, on a day-to-day basis.

    I then introduce Zen. Due to a lot of interest among listeners, this will become a recurring topic of the podcast. I look at the fundamental approach of Zen, which is to smash through the “subject-object” way of viewing things, to approach life with the eyes of a little child. I also touch briefly on the thought of Australian philosopher, Samuel Alexander, who influenced C.S. Lewis (reference Surprised by Joy).

    For a great introduction to Zen, I highly recommend the lead essay in Thomas Merton’s Mystics and Zen Masters. (Skip the first five pages or so.)

    I then introduce a second topic that I hope will be recurring: The Middle Ages. I look briefly at the “fall” of Rome, then break down every century from 800 to 1500 . . . in a 10,000-foot look in eight minutes.

    Finally, I talk about this week’s saints, with focus on St. Theresa Avila and St. Ignatius of Antioch, including Theresa’s influence on Edith Stein and Ignatius’ legendary role in Matthew Chapter 18.

    Ceiling. TrastevereThe modern Left has always been a politics of hate. From Lenin’s murderous hate to the Days of Rage to eco-terrorism to feminist rage. This piece just exemplifies it all. It half-annoyed/half-humored me to hear the gay marriage proponents describe their opponents as hateful people, when anyone who is remotely acquainted with leftist politics over the past 100 years knows it’s full of rage against society as currently constituted . . . and full of aims to bring it and all its perceived injustices tumbling down as a prelude to replacing it with a new world designed by leftist intelligentsia. They’re full of anger against anyone, like this scribe, who attempts to stand athwart what they perceive to be an historical imperative.

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    Saturday
    October 13, 2018

    It’s possible, maybe possible, that Republicans have woken up and said, “You know what? Let’s just start swinging back hard. Screw convention. Our opponents are completely unhinged at this point and can’t be dealt with conventionally.”

    The GOP hasn’t had swagger since 1980. Trump, for all his faults, has it. It’s time the GOP learn it, look absurdity in the eye, and sneer.

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    Friday
    October 12, 2018

    BYCU

    “The question is: When they have naked dancers, how is it sanitary to eat food?”

    That’s not a question I ask myself very often, but it’s the focus of this article out of Toledo.

    The conclusion: Food a strip clubs is safe because the clubs assiduously follow the rules.

    I have no grounds to dispute it, but the mere fact that the food preparation complies with the health department regulations doesn’t satisfy it for me. If you have naked bodies shaking inches from your food, common sense would dictate that it’s not a good arrangement. I seriously doubt it’s much of a risk, but still. A little disgusting. And when you think about this recent article, Hand dryers suck in fecal bacteria and blow it all over your hands, study finds, you just wonder about such things in general.

    Hey, there’s a sucker born every minute: Texas bar owners launch a line of beer for dogs.

    Within weeks of their launch, all three flavors of their beer — IPA Lot in the Yard, Mailman Malt Licker and Session.squirrel! — are available in 15 bars throughout the city, including Front Porch Pub and FM Kitchen and Bar, for a recommended price of about $5 a can. And they’re getting requests to ship cans across the country.

    “Everyone likes the idea of having a beer with their dog, you know?” says Steve, who is 41. Still, while the Longs saw the potential in their brew from the very beginning, they had no idea it would take off so quickly.

    Dog lovers often consider their dogs as their children, but if I have a beer with my children, I get arrested.

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    Thursday
    October 11, 2018

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    Wednesday
    October 10, 2018

    Bullets

    *The new Little Caesars pizza app is pretty cool. You order from the app, wait until you get a push notification, go pick it up. I detest the “hot and ready” slogan when the pizza is never ready. It looks like those days are over. It will make Dad’s Dinner Nights a lot easier.

    *A call to break-up Amazon. Ho hum. Yes, the figures offered in the opinion piece are unsettling but all monopolies fall eventually of their own weight.

    *Cool? Millennials Are Causing the U.S. Divorce Rate to Plummet. I doubt it. I’d give odds that it comes down to one thing: people without traditional morality are shacking up instead of getting married. People with traditional morality are still getting married and, because they’re traditionalists, they don’t get divorced. The article has a few other explanations that also make sense, but none of them make as much sense as the traditional morality one.

    *Buchanan with a post-Kavanaugh vote analysis: “Then the Dems watched protesters dishonor the Senate in which they serve by screaming from the gallery. It was among the lowest moments in the modern history of the Senate, and it was the Democratic minority that took it down to that depth.”

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    Tuesday
    October 9, 2018

    misc-rambling-picPodcast Update

    Well, I’ve done it: I’ve started a “real” podcast, one in which I control the feed, can host show notes, etc. It took a large chunk of my day on Sunday, but the basic site is up and running. You can check it out at eudemonpodcast.com.

    Note: This new site will not replace TDE. The new site is for the podcast only, though I will probably start posting to both sites. I’m not sure at this point.

    One thing, however, is certain: I will be phasing out the Anchor podcast feed. Probably in a month or two. So if you subscribed to The Weekly Eudemon through the Anchor feed, you should switch to the new feed. You can tell the difference because the new feed has only three episodes (to the new feed, I’m adding only episodes that have the improved format . . . music, etc.).

    Thank you for your continued support.

    misc-rambling-picThis parallels anecdotal evidence I’ve been hearing: Independents disapprove of Democrats’ handling of the Brett Kavanaugh nomination by a 28-point margin. Man, the Democrats had November in the proverbial bag. It’d be funny if this circus revealed their extremism to the independent crowd and cost them the House this year.

    misc-rambling-picI don’t know if I’m amused or a bit disgusted: Brett Kavanaugh just hired the Supreme Court’s first all-women law clerk team. The left probably just figures he considers it a harem.

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    Monday
    October 8, 2018

    Miscellaneous Rambling

    Welcome to Columbus Day. Thanksgiving Day in Canada. Also the anniversary of the Fourth Ecumenical Council at Chalcedon, which was convened on this day in 451. I believe this was the nastiest of the councils, with monks rioting in the street in support of their respective sides. Think “Antifa v. Alt-Right,” but with a measure of intelligence. The unpleasantness spilled over into the post-Chalcedon Church, resulting in poor treatment of Christians who continued to adhere to the Monophysite heresy, which made those populations more receptive to Islam when it arrived 170 years later.

    Ceiling. TrastevereThings are going well at The Weekly Eudemon podcast. I am re-working the introduction this week, but otherwise, what you hear now is the product moving forward. If you like it, please rate it or leave a review on iTunes, follow it on Spotify, or like it on your favorite podcast platform. If you don’t mind posting it to your Facebook, Twitter, and/or Instagram pages, that would be greatly appreciated as well.


    Ceiling. TrastevereI like to think my knowledge about movie history is slightly above average. I base this mostly on the fact that I’ve read two books about Hollywood, one specifically about its history, and I’ve enjoyed many essays by Daniel Fuchs.

    But, somewhat embarrassingly, I didn’t know that the Streisand A Star is Born (1976) was a remake. From Wikipedia:

    A Star Is Born is a 1937 American Technicolor romantic drama film produced by David O. Selznick, directed by William A. Wellman from a script by Wellman, Robert Carson, Dorothy Parker, and Alan Campbell, and starring Janet Gaynor (in her only Technicolor film) as an aspiring Hollywood actress, and Fredric March (in his Technicolor debut) as a fading movie star who helps launch her career. The supporting cast features Adolphe Menjou, May Robson, Andy Devine, Lionel Stander, and Owen Moore.

    It has been remade three times: in 1954 (starring Judy Garland and James Mason), in 1976 (starring Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson), and in 2018 (starring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper).

    I realized my ignorance while reading this somewhat scathing review of the current version by Rex Reed:

    I must also add that the fawning critical slobber being dumped on this film, while not exactly misguided, is still very much out of synch with reality. One moron in Chicago even calls it “the greatest Star is Born of all time,” which is not only ridiculous but a bald-faced lie. . . .

    The high-voltage ghost of Judy Garland haunts every frame and illuminates every shadow in the film, and Lady Gaga seems to know it. In an early scene, she is walking down a dark alley to the street. Out of nowhere, she starts singing a set of lyrics her fan base ignores, considering the scene superfluous and baffling. What they don’t realize is that she’s singing the verse to Judy Garland’s most durable theme song, a little ditty called “Over the Rainbow.”

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    Sunday
    October 7, 2018

    Call me “Humpty”

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    The Weekly Eudemon: 10.7.2018

    Show Notes

    Primary Obligations: The emptiness of the 24/7 argument.
    Does modern libertarianism conflict with the Catechism?
    Early Rise of the Centralized State.
    A’Kempis and a Mild Critique of Libertarianism.
    St. Symeon the New Theologian.
    Drunks on Screen.

    Music:

    Used pursuant to the Creative Commons Noncommercial Sharealike License.
    All available at Free Music Archive.

    Scott Holmes: Heavy Rock
    Eddy: All the Way Up
    Waylon Thornton: Favorite Secrets
    Halloween: Mickey Maos
    Not Drunk: The Joy Drops
    The Crevulators: You’d Come Back to Me

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    Friday
    October 5, 2018

    IMG_3150Brews You Can Use

    One of the more humorous drinking things I saw this week: Modern Drunkard Magazine’s “Today’s Reason to Drink” is now an Alexa Skill. Link.

    We missed National Vodka Day. It was yesterday. I didn’t even know we had such a Commie holiday in the U.S. Besides drinking, I’m not sure what one does on National Vodka Day. Perhaps sit around and think about the invention of the Moscow Mule and vodka’s first inroads on these shores?

    I really like this: An anti-list. Six things NOT to buy a whiskey lover. Whiskey Bottle Table Lamps: “The market for these monstrosities is clearly dudes who still use the term ‘man cave’ non-ironically,” jokes Goldfarb. The article, incidentally, also has a list of things a whiskey lover would enjoy.

    Excellent piece: “The Lost Art of Acting Drunk: From W.C. Fields to John Belushi, the rise and fall of the comedic drunk on TV and in films.” Excerpt:

    The era of the comic drunk began to draw to a close in the 1970s. The decade began with the U.S. Congress passing the Comprehensive Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Prevention Treatment and Rehabilitation Act, and ended with the founding of Mothers Against Drunk Driving. Alcoholism was increasingly considered a disease, and making fun of an illness was society’s red line.

    Public inebriates still appeared on screen—John Belushi in Animal House (1978), Dudley Moore in Arthur (1981), Kate Hudson in Almost Famous (2000)—but the drunkenness was invariably part of a more fleshed-out role. (Stoners arguably took over the job of comic walk-on relief about the same time. Think: Cheech and Chong’s Up in Smoke in 1978; Sean Penn in Fast Times at Ridgemont High in 1982). In the 1986 Andy Griffith revival, Return to Mayberry, even Otis had sobered up and now drove an ice cream truck.

    The era of the character actor drunk was over. When drunks appeared on the screen, they wore a mantle of pathos, an asterisk that conveyed the notion “Funny, but sad.”

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