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Samuel Johnson, The Idler, 4/5/1760




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    Friday
    January 17, 2020

    BYCU

    Mid-January. Winter storm warnings afoot. What else is there to do but drink? Apparently, Anheuser-Busch agrees. For every inch of snow that falls, it’s offering $1 off select Busch products in these cities: Des Moines, Iowa; Grand Rapids, Michigan; Minneapolis; Fargo, North Dakota; Omaha; Buffalo, New York; and Green Bay, Wisconsin.

    Yeah, a stupid gimmick. But they need one. They need several.

    In 2018, alcohol consumption in the United States dropped for the third-straight year, according to IWSR Drinks Market Analysis. And beer is to blame: Sales of a case of beer declined 1.5%. For the past five years, beer volume in the US declined 2.4%, the firm said. The trend doesn’t appear to be reversing itself. Sales of domestic beer slipped 4.6% between October 2018 and October 2019, according to Nielsen. Microbrew and craft beers are also in a minor slump, down 0.4%. Link.

    The article says spiked seltzer, canned wine, pre-made cocktails, and premium liquor are taking the biggest bite out of the beer industry. Within the premium liquors, tequila, whiskey, and vodka are increasing their sales the fastest. That really surprises me. I thought gin would’ve been in the top three (I thought the vodka craze peaked two years ago). Oh well. More for me.

    Unrelated: There’s an article at Outside Online about Scotland’s most-remote pub. I haven’t read it yet. And, to be honest, given its length, I doubt I will. But it looks really good. From the introduction:

    For many years, the legend of the Old Forge echoed down the glens and out across the world. I heard stories of midsummer nights when the light never quite left the sky and the music never left the pub—the fiddles reeled, the beer flowed, walkers steeled their trail-weary limbs and danced on the tables and out into the streets in the gathering dawn. The hangovers lasted an eternity.

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    Thursday
    January 16, 2020

    When the full truth and weight of the absurd hits a person, the result can be dramatic. A person might stand against the wall and wail, like H.G. Wells’ frustrated utopian expectations giving way to defeatist whimpers at the end of his life in Mind at the End of its Tether. Or a man might throw a tantrum and flail away at the silent oak tree universe, like I hear William Faulkner used to do—get drunk, stagger into his backyard, and shake his fist and curse at the heavens. Or a person might sit in a café someplace and snarl at everything and everyone, like existentialists in the 1950s who read Camus’ novels and adopted a despairing, estranged, nihilist attitude toward a meaningless world.

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    Wednesday
    January 15, 2020

    Rambling

    Whew. The new-year blitz is over. Three closings in 12 days. For the non-lawyers out there: Closings are when a business or piece of real estate changes hands. First, you sign a purchase agreement. Then the buyer does his due diligence and various other negotiations and issues are addressed. Then you close. Closings are the transactional attorney’s equivalent to a trial. Pretty much everything stops for a closing. On the days leading up to a closing, it’s not unusual to get over 100 emails from the various parties: the lender, the lender’s attorney, the other party’s attorney, the title company, the closing agent, the surveyor, etc. Such frenzied activity pretty much makes it impossible to deal with any other matters, so you have to work late to return other clients’ emails, plus you have your regular appointments, etc.

    In short, closings are hard, so three of them over nine business days was brutal. Fortunately, all of them went well. Few things are worse than a closing that starts to blow up at the 11th hour: the tension, the arguing, the threats of taking it to the judge. It is, in short, awful, but none of that happened in my closings this year.

    And now, I can focus on other things.

    Like this blog.

    I have a few aims for 2020, and one of them is to improve this blog and gradually shift the audience to The Weekly Eudemon blog site. In blog years, TDE is older than dirt, and it’s showing its age with lots of technical problems that can’t be fixed without a major overhaul and expense. I’m not sure how much longer I’m going to be willing to pay the $150 a year to keep it going and, honestly, I half-expect it to collapse altogether some day. So if that happens, and you try to come here and can’t get through, go to The Weekly Eudemon blog site. The content is nearly identical.

    I hope everyone’s 2020 is going well.

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    Tuesday
    January 14, 2020

    “There is only one really serious philosophical problem, that of suicide. To judge that life is or is not worth the trouble of being lived, this is to reply to the fundamental question of philosophy.” These words stand at the beginning of Albert Camus’ philosophy. The question of suicide (and later murder) were his touchstones. For Camus, both questions arose from a problem that he called “the absurd.”

    The absurd, Camus said, is the state of existence that is every man’s lot because nothing corresponds to his highest yearnings. In order to understand what Camus is saying, consider how ridiculous it would be if there was no such thing as food, but we had an appetite for it. At some point someone would become aware of the odd juxtaposition of appetite and no food, and say, “What’s going on here? Why do we have an appetite if there is no such thing as food to satisfy it?” That’s the same thing Camus said about man’s desires and dreams. Every man hopes, but there is nothing to satisfy his hopes. Man naturally harbors desires, but there is nothing to respond to them. Man is like an abandoned baby crying to an oak tree for milk. That, Camus said, is absurd.

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    Monday: Episode 58 Released
    January 13, 2020

    Show Notes

    St. Anthony the Great Feast Day Coming Up. This Friday.

    Keep in mind where you are in history. The Roman Empire converted to Christianity/Catholicism. Constantine ended persecution and himself converted. NOTE: He did not make Christianity the official religion. That happened about 75 years later under Theodosius, still in the 4th century, but Christianity definitely became the “in” thing under Constantine.

    Dying for one’s faith was considered the supreme act. Almost a straight path to heaven, but without the twenty virgin whores at your disposal. Ah, and another key difference with Islam: you can never seek it out. It’s almost a mix of Islam and Hinduism. Islam: Seek it out; Hinduism: detachment to the point you let it happen . . . wading into the Ganges to be eaten by crocodiles if that’s what happens. The Christian martyr has the detachment, but without the morbidity: the martyr also loves life, as a gift of God. They would just assume continue to enjoy it, but he has the religious fervor, but without the militant assertion (and hatred) of the Muslim terrorist.

    The Hindu seems to seek in The Existential Gap . . . and disappears. Denial of subject-object. Extreme. The Muslim is soaked in subject-object: God, object, and the twenty virgin whores for me, subject. Pinging back and forth fervently . . . crazed. The Christian martyr appreciates the importance of The Existential Gap, but appreciates it for what it is: a GAP. Between subject-object. It’s a cool place to be . . . but not the only place to be.

    But with Constantine, martyrdom was no longer likely. Like I said, any dope, regardless of intellectual vigor or will, could be a Christian. And lots of dopes were becoming Christians, thereby making it fashionable.

    There was no red martyrdom . . . getting killed. Or even rose martyrdom . . . being despised. In fact, you could argue that converting to Catholicism in the fourth century was a cowardly thing to do. And staying Catholic and enjoying the fruits of the state a dishonorable thing.

    Enter St. Anthony. And white martyrdom.

    His biography is simple, and his biography was the first biography: written by St. Athanasius. A saint on a saint. A rare find. It’s a beautiful, if often outlandish, book. It has continued to resonate with people. The great Gustave Flaubert (hardly a monkish ascetic: wrote Madame Bovary; liked to bang prostitutes) pondered the story for 20 years then rewrote it in his own terms.

    Born in 251. Parents died. Sold all, provided for his sister, then went to the desert in 285. 20 years in hermitage, then came out. 305. Went back in. Came back out. Always lived by himself, but he came out to act as a spiritual father to those attracted to the way of life. He, combined with toleration for Christians, drove the 4th century rush for the desert. Hundreds of thousands. Hundreds of monasteries. Four remain today, btw.

    Second Segment

    Sayings of the Desert Fathers. I’ve seen/dipped into three. Sayings of the Desert Fathers by Benedicta Ward. Wisdom of the Desert by Thomas Merton. The Spiritual Meadow by John Moschos. Didn’t care for The Spiritual Meadow. Not sure why. Might have to try it again. Tastes change as we change.

    Benedicta Ward’s is probably my favorite. Consider:

    “Just as fish die if they stay too long out of water, so the monks who loiter outside their cells or pass their time with men of the world lose the intensity of inner peace.”

    Great quote. And it shows how someone removed from us by nearly 2,000 years and half a world and ten cultures is relevant. Yes, we won’t have the inner peace of a desert monk living off bread, but who can doubt that affairs of the world torture the soul and leave it without peace? Our task is to find that blended life, so in a sense, our task is harder than the desert monk’s, though, in reality, his is the hardest of all, but for reasons entirely alien to our way of life.

    Another great quote from Anthony: “A time is coming when men will go mad, and when they see someone who is not mad, they will attack him saying, ‘You are mad, you are not like us.’” Welcome to being Non-Woke.

    And then there are the puzzling ones that, probably because I’m not a desert monk, I have a real time even beginning to appreciate:

    “He who wishes to live in solitude in the desert is delivered from three conflicts: hearing, speech, and sight; there is only one conflict for him and that is with fornication.”

    I think I’d like to see the original script for that one. Fornication? With whom? Not masturbation? Not sodomy? Fornication? Succubi?

    Third Segment: Lightning Segments

    Fourth Segment

    Go back to Episode 55. There I talked about how reason/logic can’t explain how I got to the CVS. I talked about how the brilliant and learned Samuel Johnson refuted Bishop Berkeley’s idealism by kicking a rock . . . which is no refutation at all, but Johnson intuited that no rationale refutation was possible: The stone, according to reason, didn’t exist, and that was that . . . until he kicked it.

    The point is, experience overrides reason. Experience shows us there’s something besides reason/logic. More than reason/logic. But we’re using reason/logic to override reason/logic. Well, yeah, and I can’t reason/logic my way out of that one either, so we’re back to the limits of reason/logic. It’s mind numbing, no? It probably ought to induce silence.

    But the point is: There is more than reason/logic. We know it, we experience it.

    So what?

    This is where you’ll see philosophy is relevant. Philosophy isn’t stoner talk. Philosophy gives you a hint of how to live. Here, the hint is: Get into the Existential Gap.

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    Friday
    January 10, 2020

    BYCU

    Oh my, the drinking world is collapsing. First, I haven’t yet had a drink this decade. And now the next most-manly guy in the world is drinking non-alcoholic beer: Daniel Craig’s James Bond prefers non-alcoholic beer over a martini (shaken, not stirred) in a new international spot touting No Time to Die.

    But of course, alcohol runs as freely as water. It’ll continue to pump joy through our veins. There’s always something new in the drinking universe. Heck, just last night, I read for the first time about Facebook’s vigorous black market in bourbon. It’s definitely the most interesting drinking piece of the young decade:

    “Facebook made bourbon,” says Gene Nassif, an extremely online whiskey fan from Iowa. He rightly notes that bourbon had been pretty dead since the 1960s, when clear spirits like vodka started rising to the forefront. Then, in 2006, Mark Zuckerberg’s privacy-invading wet dream opened to everybody and soon thereafter began allowing members to start and join private groups. Coincidentally, a bourbon renaissance was in its nascent stages in America, propelled by the craft cocktail boom, the rise of foodie culture, and, some people even say, the Old-Fashioned-slugging louts on Mad Men, which premiered in 2007.

    There’s always something new . . . and even things ironic. In New York, they’re going to raise taxes on beer to raise money for colleges. That’s like raising taxes on cigarettes to raise money for trailer parks and carnival workers.

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    Wednesday
    January 7, 2020

    Dalrymple

    Jeremy Corbyn’s pledge to “resist” the democratic results isn’t a mere semantic problem. It points to the problem with socialists in general: They aren’t interested in democracy. They are interested in power. Central power.

    Theodore Dalrymple lays it out in this short essay.

    One resists a dictatorship; one opposes a legitimate government. Corbyn is thus like Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who once said that democracy is like a train: you get off it once you have reached your destination. It is a means to an end—in Corbyn’s case, socialist social justice; that is to say, a good rather than a bad dictatorship. For once social justice is reached, what need would there be of any politics at all, except perhaps a little light leadership?

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    Tuesday

    What happened Sunday night?

    Gervais’ monologue blew me away. What blew me away even more: quite a few cheers from the audience. More groans than cheers? Possibly, but quite a few cheers nonetheless.

    Joe Rogan observed recently that Hollywood has no soul, and Hollywood is slowly coming to the realization that “Go woke, go broke” is a very real thing.

    I also know the streaming services are putting an enormous pinch on the big screen.

    And I know at least half of the American public doesn’t share the woke vision.

    Was Gervais encouraged to let loose like that on the Woke Left? Was it an attempt by Hollywood to gain a measure of credibility with the general public?

    Perhaps I’m just smokin’ crack.

    But I also know this: Hollywood is a master of deception. If any industry could pull off such a thing, it’d be the Whores of Mulholland.

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    Monday: New TWE Episode, with Show Notes
    January 5, 2020

    I was reading David Mikics biography of Jacque Derrida. He points out that the first large urban civilizations—like Babylon and Egypt—“used writing as an elite mechanism for social control. The secrets of the realm remained in the hands of the few who had knowledge of script.”

    Did universal literacy eliminate this? Maybe in part. But it’s still there.

    Have you ever considered proper grammar? All those rules? I’m something of a grammar-phobe, albeit an imperfect one. I’m the kind of bastard that corrects my kids when they say “He is taking Fred and I to the store.” Is that a way of setting oneself apart?

    Perhaps, but there’s no social control associated with it. Just debased snobbery.

    What about wokeness? Woke language? Michael Malice points out in his new book at the SJWs are constantly changing the lingo and everyone goes along because, by using it, you’re signaling that you’re on the correct side of society.

    But is it a matter of social control? Is the “correct side” the higher social order?

    I’m afraid so.

    The Left controls the institutional social controls: Education and Media. Now, when I say “institutional,” mean the “big.” Left is big. Sure, it doesn’t control talk radio. It doesn’t control every website. It sure as heck doesn’t control the podcast universe.

    But big institutions?

    Big is Left.

    Why else would ESPN get political like it was during the teens, at a time when the country was particularly politically polarized? Fundamental common sense would tell you that, if you take a side in the political debates, you would alienate half of your viewership . . . AND YOU’RE A SPORTS NETWORK. But they did and started alienating viewers, so much so they basically apologized last May and said they’d stop.

    But why did they start?

    Because ESPN is part of Disney. It’s a syllogism that you should never forget: Disney is big ($100 billion in assets; 200,000 employees). Big is left. Therefore, Disney is left.

    By using the woke language, you’re signaling that you’re part of the Left . . . which is the same thing as saying you’re part of the elite. It’s important. It’s cowardice, too, but it’s also important for your career, your prospects, your income, your family.

    If you’re in ancient Babylon and you want to get your family that nice house on the Euphrates, you’d learn how to write. In America 2020, you keep current with the newest SJW jargon.

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    January 4, 2020

    I asked my daughter to bring me the newspaper. she said I’m too old fashioned and brought me her iPhone. Not getting too much into details, the fly is now dead, the iPhone is broken and my daughter is crying.

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    Friday
    January 3, 2020

    IMG_3150Brews You Can Use

    Whew. The holidays come to a close. There are lots of downsides to leaving childhood, but this time of year isn’t one of them. When I was a kid, I’d have the post-holiday blues. As an adult with a frantic need for down time, I have the post-holiday shrug. I like the holidays, but I also like to get back to normal and a modicum of relaxation.

    I also like getting back to a modicum of sobriety. At this juncture, I’m seriously entertaining the thought of never drinking again. That won’t happen, of course. Lots of reasons: (1) I’ll get the itch; (2) Social commitments that can’t be handled deftly without a buzz; (3) Expectations from friends and family; (4) I don’t want Marie to set me on fire:

    A 46-year-old Arizona woman faces charges of aggravated assault and criminal damage after she allegedly tried to set her boyfriend on fire. Kathy Jones was drinking to celebrate her new job at Subway. Jones reportedly told police officers she’d been drinking rum, and Smirnoff ice.

    She invited her boyfriend to join her, and he declined. Jones allegedly squirted lighter fluid all over the man, and threw lit matches at him. Link.

    A fifth reason: I got a lot of gin for Christmas, including a bottle of Hendrick’s Midsummer Solstice, which “kills it” in all the reviews. Sample:

    Hendrick’s Midsummer Solstice Gin is the upscale answer to the Pink Gin fad. Any drink that people have been enjoying with a pink fruity gin can easily swap in Hendrick’s Midsummer Solstice Gin and you’ll have a lovely floral gin and tonic or martini without the garish pink color.

    I know that floral/fruit-forward gins have a lot of fans, but the overt pink hue might make drinkers self-conscious.

    I think this has great mixing potential with citrus, as well as other floral, fruity gin drinks. Try a Tom Collins, Gimlet or a delicious Gin Bramble.

    A sixth reason: My eldest son, Alex, got engaged last week, so it’s time to open the bottle of Monkey 47 gin he bought me a few years ago.

    Monkey 47 is a bit of an outlier. Bartenders often reach for a classic London Dry, or a local American brand; this German-made gin is neither. Gins are distilled with flavor-rich botanicals, which generally number 12 or fewer; Monkey 47 uses an incredible, wait for it, forty-seven. Most gins in the States are sold in standard 750ml bottles; Monkey 47 generally comes in a dainty 375ml, which retails up around $40 or above.

    But there’s a reason that bartenders go nuts for the stuff. The array of botanicals is unmatched — from traditional juniper and lavender, to fresh citrus peel and lingonberry, to wildly unusual ingredients like spruce shoots and bramble leaves foraged from the Black Forest, where the distillery is located.

    So it would seem teetotaling sobriety will have to wait at least a few more days.

    Have a great 2020.

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    Christmas
    December 24, 2019

    “He rules the world with truth and grace.” —Isaac Watts ++ “I will honor Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year.” —Charles Dickens ++ “The Incarnation…illuminates and orders all other phenomena, explains both our laughter and our logic, our fear of the dead and our knowledge that it is somehow good to die, and which at one stroke covers what multitudes of separate theories will hardly cover for us if this is rejected.” —C.S. Lewis ++ “Regarding not the day, let us give God thanks for the gift of His dear Son… If it be possible to honor Christ in the giving of gifts, I cannot see how while the gift, giver and recipient are all in the spirit of the world… [B]ut we have a Christ gift the entire year.” —Charles Spurgeon ++ “Holiday and Holy Day, Christmas is more than a yule log, holly or tree. It is more than natural good cheer and the giving of gifts. Christmas is even more than the feast of the home and of children, the feast of love and friendship. It is more than all of these together. Christmas is Christ, the Christ of justice and charity, of freedom and peace.” —Francis Cardinal Spellman ++ “The place that the shepherds found was not an academy or an abstract republic; it was not a place of myths allegorized or dissected or explained away. It was a place of dreams come true.” —G.K. Chesterton

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    Some Have Hats
    St. Blog’s Parish Blog Digger
    St. Blog’s Parish Directory
    St. James Journal
    St. Peter Canisius Apostolate
    Standing on My Head
    Stella Maris
    Stony Creek Digest
    Streams of Mercy
    Stupid Scholar
    Suicide of the West
    Summa Minutiae
    Taki
    The American Conservative
    The Blue Boar
    The Cafeteria is Closed
    The Crescat
    The Curt Jester
    The Dawn Patrol
    The Drunken Dollar
    The Impractical Christian
    The Inn at the End of the World
    The Michiana Blawg
    The Muniment Room
    The Radical Academy
    The Reticulator
    The Saint Wannabe
    The Scratching Post
    The Snoring Scholar
    The Summa Mamas
    The Waffling Anglican
    The Western Confucian
    Things and Stuff
    Thursday Night Gumbo
    Uncovering Orthodoxy
    Victor Lams
    Video Meliora
    Vita Mea
    Vox Nova
    What's Wrong with the World
    With Both Hands
    Within the Garden
    Without Having Seen
    World Wide Words

    the bloghorn
    Abbey-Roads
    Acts of the Apostasy
    After Abortion
    Aggie Catholics
    All Manner of Things
    Belinda’s Brain
    Bethune Catholic
    Betty Duffy
    Book Reviews and More
    Catholic Blogs
    Catholic Exchange
    Catholic Fire
    Charlotte Was Both
    Chesterton and Friends
    Crossroads
    Decent Films
    Digital Hairshirt
    Dyspeptic Mutterings
    EWTN
    Fathers of the Church
    First Principles
    Get Blogs
    Gilbert Magazine
    Godspy
    Happy Catholic
    Mark Shea
    Mere Comments
    Michelle Reitemeyer
    More Last Than Star
    National Catholic Register
    New Advent
    Phat Catholic
    Pillar and Fire
    Post Modern Papist
    PowerBlog
    Pro Ecclesia
    Quaffs and Quibbles
    Reasoned Audacity
    Reconnaissance of the Western Tradition
    Roman Catholic Info
    Ruri et Orbi
    Scholium
    Shadow of Diogenes
    Signs of the Times: Salvo Blog
    Some Have Hats
    St. Blog’s Parish Blog Digger
    St. Blog’s Parish Directory
    St. James Journal
    St. Peter Canisius Apostolate
    Standing on My Head
    Stella Maris
    Stony Creek Digest
    Streams of Mercy
    Stupid Scholar
    Suicide of the West
    Summa Minutiae
    Taki
    The American Conservative
    The Blue Boar
    The Cafeteria is Closed
    The Crescat
    The Curt Jester
    The Dawn Patrol
    The Drunken Dollar
    The Impractical Christian
    The Inn at the End of the World
    The Michiana Blawg
    The Muniment Room
    The Radical Academy
    The Reticulator
    The Saint Wannabe
    The Scratching Post
    The Snoring Scholar
    The Summa Mamas
    The Waffling Anglican
    The Western Confucian
    Things and Stuff
    Thursday Night Gumbo
    Uncovering Orthodoxy
    Victor Lams
    Video Meliora
    Vita Mea
    Vox Nova
    What's Wrong with the World
    With Both Hands
    Within the Garden
    Without Having Seen
    World Wide Words

    << # St. Blog's Parish ? >> 


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